Mindy Fisher: Smirking Serpents Seizing Spaceships and Other Secretive Scenes

First Floor Gallery, Center for Arts and Learning, Feb. 1 – Apr. 27, 2019
Reception during Feb. 1st Art Walk, 4-8 pm

Mindy Fisher, Squid and Bunnies

Mindy Fisher calls her series of fantastically loud, cataclysmically calligraphic abstract paintings ‘ornaglyphs’. As the name suggests, there is an almost-language of symbolic characters in them – her marks seem like a system of writing lost to the world, and her colors suggest the chaos of a jungle of birds taking off all at once. They are abstract, but funny and full of personality, an all-over pattern that refuses to stay still. They call to mind the garish palette and crazy aliens of late-night cartoons, but when you look at them the colors create unlikely sophisticated harmonies. Mindy describes them as battle scenes, but not from earthly wars: these are how a bubbly six-year old, armed with a golden cape and a pink sword, might imagine her path to glory.

Mindy Fisher grew up in a small town in New Hampshire. In 1998 she moved to Chicago to study set design at Columbia College. She stayed in Chicago and focused on painting, cartooning, and self-taught animation. She taught at Right Brained Studio in Oak Park, Il. She now lives and works in Vermont. She has shown work all over the country, including Chicago, Cincinnati, Portland (Oregon), and Rutland, Vermont. Last year she participated in Vermont Studio Center’s Vermont Artists Week residency program.

Alexis Kyriak: Anima

Second Floor Gallery, Center for Arts and Learning, Feb. 1 – Apr. 27, 2019
Reception during Feb. 1st Art Walk, 4-8pm.

Image of a nude form and space
Alexis Kyriak, Seated Moon

Medieval people made pilgrimages, walking across entire countries to visit specific religious sites that held relics – parts of the bodies of saints. Though the reliquaries holding these objects were highly decorated, the important part was inside – you could often open a tiny door to reach in and hold the relic while praying. People believed they had to have this physical connection in order truly commune with the spiritual.

Alexis Kyriak’s work shares this sensibility. Her forms are never whole; they are not bodies carrying identities, but instead embody a perception of the elements, the seasons, the divine, the mythic. The spirit and body are almost one and the same, but there is a tension between weight and emptiness, light and darkness. Kyriak sees them as representing a concept of the feminine, but they are not women. She never gives them heads.

Alexis Kyriak lives and works in Northfield, Vermont. She has studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, the Art Students’ League, the National Academy of Fine Art & Design, the Brooklyn Museum School, and elsewhere. She has shown work locally at various venues including the Helen Day Center in Stowe, Studio Place Arts in Barre, and Artful Things in Lebanon, New Hampshire, among others.

James Secor: As Not Seen

First Floor Gallery, Center for Arts & Learning, Dec.7, 2018 – Jan. 26, 2019

James Secor, Units M-Q (Mickey D's), acrylic on paper, 2018
James Secor, Units M-Q (Mickey D’s), acrylic on paper, 2018

James Secor’s work often features that which you don’t see, or rather, what you don’t typically look at. Vermont tends to create landscape painters, and many of them focustheir view on our breathtaking hills and valleys, sunsets and lakes. Secor,instead, makes you look at a highway median, a no parking sign, the alley between buildings, the storage units you drive past on your morning commute. He is interested in the parts of the landscape that fall away as noise between views, that get glossed over.

Recently, Secor has been attracted by the strangeness of storage units. Their geometry and repetition can give them a formal, minimalist beauty, made all the stranger because of what may or may not be inside. They speak to hoarding and consumerism; they’re the last resort for when the stuff you have – owned,inherited, acquired by accident – becomes overwhelming. They are calm containers for the emotions we can’t bear to throw away.

Fill your storage unit at http://jamessecor.com/asnotseen

Through My Eyes: Digital Photography from the Montpelier Senior Activity Center

Second Floor Gallery, Center for Arts & Learning, Dec.7, 2018 – Jan. 26, 2019

Diana Celia, digital print

Through My Eyes is about new ways of seeing. Each of the artists has been pursuing a photographic approach to looking at the world, carefully framing or constructing a momentary perspective. The show is made up of works by students from the MSAC Digital Photography class and the Photo Walk Group, both led by Linda Hogan. The show includes works by Diana Ahern, Amy Davenport, Leyla Khasiyeva, Linda Hall, David Healy, Don Hirsch, Margot Lasher, Tracy Loyson, Sam Matthews, Erika Mitchell, Laura Morse, Susan Ritz, and Susan Stukey.